Dr. Jung: Yes, by desire you are bound to things, and when they become chaotic you are drawn into the chaos.

Dr. Jung: Of course not, we are moving now in a field where she has understood almost nothing.

She had these visions after she left here, and I have never had a chance to talk with her about them.

It is utterly improbable that she could have understood this.

The whole thing develops in the unconscious with no interference from the conscious.

The next move will impress you with its simple logic.

The title of this new series of visions is: “The Pit of Onyx.”

You know that onyx is a semiprecious stone of beautiful colors, usually rather dark.

Many precious vessels made of onyx are preserved from antiquity, particularly small vessels for ointments, or little tear jugs for funerals.

She says:The narrow path opened into a circle.

I saw a round pit of onyx which went down into the earth like a cone.

What do you make of the first sentence?-“the narrow path opened into a circle.”

Mrs. Crowley: It looks like a mandala of some kind.

Dr. Jung: It is surely a mandala, and that always means a protective circle against the surrounding fire, against that thing which mixes one up with worldly events or with the bewildering facts of one’s surroundings-which sweeps one along in a stampede, for instance.

And what makes one fall into such a chaotic condition?

Mrs. Crowley: Emotion.

Miss Hannah: Participation mystique.

Dr. Jung: In a state of participation mystique one always projects emotion, but that emotional condition is brought about, according to the Buddhist teaching, by what?

Mrs. Bailward: The flames of desire.

Dr. Jung: Yes, by desire you are bound to things, and when they become chaotic you are drawn into the chaos.

Now against this desire which is always trying to tear you to bits, to pull you hither and thither, the best means is to draw a magic circle round yourself, so that nothing can escape and nothing can come in; that is the first attempt at an attitude.

And in the center of this circle is that round pit of onyx going down into the earth like a cone.

What is that thing for?

What will happen when she approaches the center of the circle?

Frau Stutz: Either she will fall in or something will come out.

Dr. Jung: Yes, and this situation would be like the lion making for the amphora.

The pit of onyx would be the amphora, and onyx is a precious substance out of which vases are made, so she is seeking a particularly precious vessel in which something is contained, out of which something might come, or into which she might get-we don’t know.

She might fall in, we must see what follows.

But inside this magic circle she would be protected against the surrounding flames, the desire and the Panicky condition.

Now she looks down into the pit, and says: “At the bottom I beheld an old Indian woman holding in her arms the Mexican image which seemed alive.”

We assumed that that Mexican image must be a spiritual symbol because it was in the sky, in the kingdom of the air.

So at the bottom of the pit of onyx, the mandala, she beholds a symbol of a peculiar kind of spirit.

Why should it be Mexican? And why an Indian woman?

Mrs. Baumann: She is an American.

Dr. Jung: Yes, these are her ancestors who are connected with the soil, and soil is just matter, the absolute opposite of the spirit, yet it contains the spirit.

Without encountering the soil one would never realize the spirit; it needs that resistance of matter in order to reveal itself.

So she comes back to her primitive Indian ancestors, her spiritual ancestors, and the old Indian woman is holding that spiritual Mexican image which seems to be alive.

The symbol of the spirit has gained life. ~Carl Jung, Visions Seminar, Pages 1045-1046

Carl Jung across the web:

Blog: http: http://carljungdepthpsychology.blogspot.com/

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Great Sites to visit:

1. Jenna Lilla’s Path of the Soul http://jennalilla.org/

2. Steve Jung-Hearted Parker’s Jung Currents http://jungcurrents.com/

3. Frith Luton’s Jungian Dream Analysis and Psychotherapy: http://frithluton.com/articles/

Rabbi David Zeller: It Furthers One To See The Great Man.

Growing up in a house with Jung’s picture in most every room, and living in Switzerland with my parents-they in analysis and classes at the Institute, I and my sister in boarding schools in the Alps-this was my opportunity to meet the great man.

I wrote a very serious eleven-year-old’s letter asking to meet him, and got an answer from his secretary that reached out, tousled my hair, and said Jung was very busy.

Then, a breakthrough: the tenth anniversary of the Institute.

HE would be there, and Barbara Hannah, my mother’s analyst, was driving him.

She would tell him who I was, and that I was waiting for him out front.

The day came, I had a fever, but I braved the journey by streetcar and waited in the rain for his arrival.

The car pulled up, and out bounced a huge man whom I had only known from the neck up in photographs.

He came up to me and said, “So you’re Max Zeller’s son!”

I said, ”I’ve heard so much about you, I’ve. really been looking forward to meeting you …. ”

He smiled, opened his arms out wide and said, “Well, what do you think?”

I was speechless (very rare even at that young age) from my first “Zen experience.”

Jung’s unpretentiousness, his humor and his humanness have remained with me, and indeed, have furthered me.

And though I can now claim that Jung consulted me, wanting to know what I think, I’m still formulating my answer. ~Max Zeller, J.E.T., Page 107

Carl Jung: One must remember, over the animal is the god; with the god, is the god’s animal.

Another time, discussing animals, he said: “God has His animal, the dove; Jesus had his, the little
ram; the apostles all had theirs.

Now the ancients-Mithras-had different orders of initiation.

They would call the god by calling the animal-the raven, the cock-making the sounds with their
mouth, giving the call.

Sometimes they would come.

Call it synchronicity, magic, there it is.

If one can stay in the middle, know one is human, relate to both the god, and the animal of the god,
then one is all right.

One must remember, over the animal is the god; with the god, is the god’s animal.”

The last time I saw Dr. Jung was on the occasion of his eightieth birthday.

I had flown in unexpectedly, and at the large hotel reception attended by many visiting dignitaries, I
made my way to his big chair enthroned at the center of the room.

He rose to greet me, leaning on his sturdy, silver-headed cane, looking fit and handsome,
with his shock of white hair.

And the next day he unexpectedly joined those who were continuing the celebration by a chartered boat
ride around the Lake of Zurich.

And there he engaged in animated conversation with visiting doctors.

There are vivid small memories too: of the big empty chair in the club room, waiting for him,
when it was known he would be attending a meeting, and the stir that went around when he
entered and took the place reserved for him; of the evident enjoyment of the Institute
parties which he and Mrs. Jung attended-the costume parties that are so much a part of Swiss life;
of an evening when Mrs.

Jung’s class on the Holy Grail was invited to the Jung home for coffee and discussion and questions
and answers; and how inevitably Dr. Jung became head of the circle, and the one to whom the questions
were put.

I remember the look of appreciation in his eyes when I brought long-stemmed floribunda roses,
a sheaf of them, to him, on the occasion of my first appointment.

And of how the spirit of anger filled him with a tremendous vitality, once, to be dissipated as soon
as he knew the situation.

And of how, to me, his talk, ever kindly and gentle, was like a swift, clear stream on a
summer morning.

I heard from Dr. Jung just once, after my return to America, in a letter written December 23, 1959.

I should like to quote the entire letter here, and I think it speaks for itself:

Dear Miss Ainsworth,

I have read your friendly letter with interest.

I have been particularly interested in what you say about the book of Job, i.e., the divine omniscience.

While reading this little book you must be constantly aware of the fact, that whatever I say in it,
does not refer to God Himself, but rather to the idea or opinion, man makes of God to himself.

When I use the term “the omniscient God” it means: this is what man says about God and not that
God is omniscient.

Man always uses that knowledge, he finds in himself, to characterize his metaphysical figures.

Thus you could make an analogy between the obliviousness of the human being and a similar state
of his God.

But this is insofar not permissible as man himself has made the dogmatic statement, that God’s
Omniscience is absolute, and not subject to man’s shortcomings.

Thus God’s omniscience means really a perfect presence of mind and then only it becomes a blatant
contradiction, that He does not consult it, or seems to be unaware of it.

In this sense ‘God’ is very paradoxical and I call my reader’s attention to such and other contradictions,
to wake him up, so that he gets aware of the insufficiency of his representations and indirectly of
the need to revise them.

This is the point, which is regularly misunderstood: people assume that I am talking about God Himself.

In reality I am talking about human representations.

So if anybody should talk to you about my job, you better refer him to this passage.

With my best wishes for Christmas and the New Year,

I remain,

Yours sincerely,

C. G. Jung

~ Mary Louise Ainsworth , J.E.T., Pages 111-113

Carl Jung across the web:

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Great Sites to visit:

1. Jenna Lilla’s Path of the Soul http://jennalilla.org/

2. Steve Jung-Hearted Parker’s Jung Currents http://jungcurrents.com/

3. Frith Luton’s Jungian Dream Analysis and Psychotherapy: http://frithluton.com/articles/

4. Lance S. Owens The Gnosis Archives http://gnosis.org/welcome.html

Miss Wharton: Would you call those prophetic dreams?

Dr. Jung: You can call them prophetic, but with that peculiar psychological inflection naturally.

In the so-called prophetic dreams of antiquity, if you dreamt, for instance, that your house or the house of your father had collapsed, it meant that it was really going to collapse, it was a concrete event.

But if we dream that a house collapses, once in thousands of cases it might mean a real house, but as a rule it does not.

Usually it would be a psychological dream meaning that an attitude or a certain mental condition was going to collapse, because a house symbolizes a man’s psychical structure, his attitude, his beliefs, the way in which he lives, and so on.

For example, pieces of furniture mean contents, either of the conscious or of the unconscious.

And baggage, pieces of luggage, very often mean complexes; therefore those dreams where you are hurrying to change trains and discover you have a great pile of luggage and no time to carry it to the other train mean that you are not getting over your complexes, there are too many and the unconscious is overburdened.

Such dreams are not to be understood literally, they are not prophetic in that sense, but they have that quality of psychological anticipation.

Or suppose someone is going to die.

The death is not necessarily anticipated because in the unconscious it is not so terribly important whether a man is alive or dead, that seems to make very little impression upon the unconscious.

But your attitude to it matters, how you will take it, whether you believe in immortality or not, how you react to such and such an event, that matters to the unconscious.

One could say the whole psychological side of human life was the thing that is chiefly anticipated or constructed by the dreams. ~Carl Jung, Visions Seminar, Pages 902-903.

Joseph Wheelwright: A Salute to Toni Wolff

For many years I have managed to work into my speeches-and many personal communications-that Toni Wolff was the best analyst I ever had.

She has had formidable competition.

The others who have tinkered with my psyche have been Jung, Peter Baynes and Erna Rosenbaum, Elizabeth Whitney and Joe Henderson.

I could justify this galaxy of analysts but will desist at this time.

It has not been easy to spell out my gratitude and appreciation for her ministrations.

First and foremost she was a very superior woman and, though she was an accomplished analyst, she never identified with this persona-she was always herself.

With me she was, by virtue of her experience and personal development, an authority.

But at the same time she related to me as though we were equal as human beings.

Another pair of opposites that she contained was being a tough mother (she was twenty years older than me) when indicated, and at other times a supportive mother who believed in me.

Finally, I felt a profound sense of intimacy with her.

In 19 51 I returned to Zurich for the first time in twelve years.

I had been working desperately hard and, as happens to analysts from time to time, been pushed to my extreme limits as a person, in order to match patients who were as, or more, developed than I was.

This strain, as well as other things, plunged me into a deep depression.

I took a three-month leave of absence and went to Toni like a homing pigeon.

I sat down in her consulting room, took one look at her, sitting with her feet on the pillow that she used as a footstool, and her long fingers holding her long cigarette holder, and burst into uncontrollable sobbing.

After about ten minutes I got some control of myself, and in a gentle but firm voice she asked,
“What is it”?

I blurted out: “I am a patient,” and began to cry again.

But by the time the hour was over, I felt the stirring of new life and the feeling that I had turned the corner and was going to rejoin the human race.

Her last years were not easy as, after the formation of the Zurich Institute in 1948, she was no longer the leading figure in the analytic community.

But to the end she staunchly continued to give of herself to many men and women.

Her death in 1953 was merciful.

She died in her sleep, presumably from a heart attack. ~Joseph Wheelwright, J.E.T., Pages 106-107

Carl Jung across the web:

Blog: http: http://carljungdepthpsychology.blogspot.com/

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Scoop.It: http://www.scoop.it/u/maxwell-purrington

Twitter: https://twitter.com/MaxwellPurringt

WordPress: https://carljungdepthpsychology.wordpress.com/

Great Sites to visit:

1. Jenna Lilla’s Path of the Soul http://jennalilla.org/

2. Steve Jung-Hearted Parker’s Jung Currents http://jungcurrents.com/

3. Frith Luton’s Jungian Dream Analysis and Psychotherapy: http://frithluton.com/articles/

4. Lance S. Owens The Gnosis Archives http://gnosis.org/welcome.html

Carl Jung: …in all chaos there is a cosmos, in all disorder a secret order…

Thus the anima and life itself are meaningless in so far as they offer no interpretation.

Yet they have a nature that can be interpreted, for in all chaos there is a cosmos, in all disorder a secret order, in all caprice a fixed law, for everything that works is grounded on its opposite.

It takes man’s discriminating understanding, which breaks everything down. into antinomial judgments, to recognize this.

Once he comes to grips with the anima, her chaotic capriciousness will give him cause to suspect a secret order, to sense a plan, a meaning, a purpose over and above her nature, or even-we might almost be tempted to say-to “postulate” such a thing, though this would not be in accord with the truth.

For in actual reality we do not have at our command any power of cool reflection, nor does any science or philosophy help us, and the traditional teachings of religion do so only to a limited degree.

We are caught and entangled in aimless experience, and the judging intellect with its categories proves itself powerless.

Human interpretation fails, for a turbulent life-situation has arisen that refuses to fit any of the traditional meanings assigned to it.

It is a moment of collapse.

We sink into a final depth-Apuleius calls it “a kind of voluntary death.”

It is a surrender of our own powers, not artificially willed but forced upon us by nature; not a voluntary submission and humiliation decked in moral garb but an utter and unmistakable defeat crowned with the panic fear of demoralization.

Only when all props and crutches are broken, and no cover from the rear offers even the slightest hope of security, does it become possible for us to experience an archetype that up till then had lain hidden behind the meaningful nonsense played out by the anima.

This is the archetype of meaning) just as the anima is the archetype of life itself. ~Carl Jung, CW 9i, Page 32, Para 66.

Carl Jung across the web:

Blog: http: http://carljungdepthpsychology.blogspot.com/

Google+: https://plus.google.com/102529939687199578205/posts

Facebook: Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/56536297291/

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/grp/home?gid=4861719&sort=recent&trk=my_groups-tile-flipgrp

Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/Carl-Jung-326016020781946/

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Scoop.It: http://www.scoop.it/u/maxwell-purrington

Twitter: https://twitter.com/MaxwellPurringt

WordPress: https://carljungdepthpsychology.wordpress.com/

Great Sites to visit:

1. Jenna Lilla’s Path of the Soul http://jennalilla.org/

2. Steve Jung-Hearted Parker’s Jung Currents http://jungcurrents.com/

3. Frith Luton’s Jungian Dream Analysis and Psychotherapy: http://frithluton.com/articles/

4. Lance S. Owens The Gnosis Archives http://gnosis.org/welcome.html