Some Carl Jung Quotations XXXIX

The West is always seeking uplift, but the East seeks a sinking or deepening. ~Carl Jung, CW 11, Para 396.

The European seeks to raise himself above this world, while the Indian likes to turn back into the maternal depths of
Nature. ~Carl Jung, CW 11, Para 396.

The fact that the East can dispose so easily of the ego seems to point to a mind that is not to be
identified with our “mind.” ~Carl Jung, CW 11, Para 775.

In the East, mind is a cosmic factor, the very essence of existence; while in the West we have just begun to understand
that it is the essential condition of cognition, and hence of the cognitive existence of the world. ~Carl Jung, CW 11, Para 768.

There is no conflict between religion and science in the East, because no science is there based
upon the passion for facts, and no religion upon mere faith; there is religious cognition and cognitive
religion. ~Carl Jung, CW 11, Para 768.

With us, man is incommensurably small and the grace of God is everything; but in the East, man is God and he
redeems himself. ~Carl Jung, CW 11, Para 768.

The philosophy of the East, although so vastly different from ours, could be an inestimable treasure for us too;
but, in order to process it, we must first earn it. ~Carl Jung, CW 11, Para 961.

While the Western mind carefully sifts, weighs, selects, classifies, isolates, the Chinese picture of the moment
encompasses everything down to the minutest nonsensical detail, because all of the ingredients
make up the observed moment. ~Carl Jung, CW 11, Para 969

We believe in doing, the Indian in impassive being. Our religious exercises consist of prayer, worship, and
singing hymns. ~Carl Jung, CW 11, Para 911.

The Indian’s most important exercise is yoga, an immersion in what we would call an unconscious state, but
which he praises as the highest consciousness. ~Carl Jung, CW 11, Para 911.

Yoga is the most eloquent expression of the Indian mind and at the same time the instrument continually used to
produce this peculiar attitude of mind. ~Carl Jung, CW 11, Para 911.

The goal of Eastern religious practice is the same as that of Western mysticism: the shifting of the center of gravity from the ego
to the self, from man to God. ~Carl Jung, CW 11, Para 958

We cannot tell whether God and the unconscious are two different entities. Both are border-line concepts
for transcendental contents. ~Carl Jung, CW 11, Para 757

The numinosum is either a quality belonging to a visible object or the influence of an invisible
presence that causes a peculiar alteration of consciousness. ~Carl Jung, CW 11, Para 6

Holiness is also revelatory: it is the illuminative power emanating from an archetypal figure. ~Carl Jung, CW 11, Para 225.

But, fortunately, the man [Wolfgang Pauli] had religio, that is, he “carefully took account of” his experiences and he
had enough pistis, or loyalty to his experience, to enable him to hang on to it and continue it. ~Carl Jung, CW 11, Para 74.

There is religious sentimentality instead of the numinosum of divine experience. This is the well-known characteristic
of a religion that has lost its living mystery. ~Carl Jung, CW 11, Para 52

But the fact is that the approach to the numinous is the real therapy and in as much as you attain
to the numinous experiences you are released from the curse of pathology. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 377

Religion is the fruit and culmination of the completeness of life, that is, of a life which contains both
sides. ~Carl Jung, CW 11, Para 71.

It is also a fact that under the influence of a so-called scientific enlightenment great masses of
educated people have either left the Church or become profoundly indifferent to it. ~Carl Jung, CW 11, Para 34.

I am not, however, addressing myself to the happy possessors of faith, but to those many people
for whom the light has gone out, the mystery has faded, and God is dead. ~Carl Jung, CW 11, Para 148.

Myth is not fiction: it consists of facts that are continually repeated and can be observed
over and over again. ~Carl Jung, CW 11, Para 648.

It [myth] is something that happens to man, and men have mythical fates just as much as the Greek
heroes do. ~Carl Jung, CW 11, Para 648.

Man is not so much delivered from his sins, even if he is baptized in the prescribed manner and thus washed clean,
as delivered from fear of the consequences of sin, that is, from the wrath of God. ~Carl Jung, CW 11, Para 659.

What is ordinarily called “religion” is a substitute to such an amazing degree that I ask myself seriously whether this kind
of “religion,” which I prefer to call a creed, may not after all have an important function in human society. ~Carl Jung, CW 11, Para 75.

In my profession I have encountered many people who have had immediate experience and who would not and could not
submit to the authority of ecclesiastical decision. ~Carl Jung, CW 11, Para 76

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Carl Jung on “Archetypes.”

The unconscious, as the totality of all archetypes, is the deposit of all human experience right back to its remotest beginnings.

Not, indeed, a dead deposit, a sort of abandoned rubbish-heap, but a living system of reactions and aptitudes that determine the
individual’s life in invisible ways —all the more effective because invisible.

It is not just a gigantic historical prejudice, so to speak, an a priori historical condition; it is also the source of the instincts,
for the archetypes are simply the forms which the instincts assume.

From the living fountain of instinct flows everything that is creative; hence the unconscious is not merely conditioned by
history, but is the very source of the creative impulse.

It is like Nature herself—prodigiously conservative, and yet transcending her own historical conditions in her acts of creation.

No wonder, then, that it has always been a burning question for humanity how best to adapt to these invisible determinants.

If consciousness had never split off from the unconscious—an eternally repeated event symbolized as the fall of the
angels and the disobedience of the first parents—this problem would never have arisen, any more than would the question of
environmental adaptation. ~Carl Jung, CW 8, Para 339.

By means of “active imagination” we are put in a position of advantage, for we can then make the discovery of the archetype
without sinking back into the instinctual sphere, which would only lead to blank unconsciousness or, worse still, to
some kind of intellectual substitute for instinct. ~Carl Jung, CW 8, Para 414

Whether this psychic structure and its elements, the archetypes, ever “originated” at all is a metaphysical question and therefore unanswerable. ~Carl Jung, CW 9i, Para 187.

The archetype—let us never forget this—is a psychic organ present in all of us. ~Carl Jung, CW 9i, Para 271

Man must remain conscious of the world of the archetypes, because in it he is still a part of Nature and is connected with his
own roots. ~Carl Jung, CW 9i, Para 174

The archetypes are imperishable elements of the unconscious, but they change their shape continually. ~Carl Jung, CW 9i, Para 301

When, towards middle life, the last gleam of childhood illusion fades—this it must be owned is true only of an almost ideal life, for many go as children to their graves—then the archetype of the mature man or woman emerges from the parental imago: an image of man as woman has known him from the beginning of time, and an image of woman that man carries within him eternally. ~Carl Jung, CW 10, Para 74

All human control comes to an end when the individual is caught in a mass movement.

Then the archetypes begin to function, as happens also in the lives of individuals when they are confronted with situations that cannot be dealt with in any of the familiar ways. ~Carl Jung, CW 10, Para 395

Archetypes are, by definition, factors and motifs that arrange the psychic elements into certain images, characterized as
archetypal, but in such a way that they can be recognized only from the effects they produce.

They exist preconsciously, and presumably they form the structural dominants of the psyche in general.

They may be compared to the invisible presence of the crystal lattice in a saturated solution.

As a priori conditioning factors they represent a special, psychological instance of the biological “pattern of behaviour,” which gives all living organisms their specific qualities.

Just as the manifestations of this biological ground plan may change in the course of development, so also can those of the archetype.

Empirically considered, however, the archetype did not ever come into existence as a phenomenon of organic life, but entered into the picture with life itself. ~Carl Jung, CW 11, Para 222.

It is only through the psyche that we can establish that God acts upon us, but we are unable to distinguish whether these actions emanate from God or from the unconscious.

We cannot tell whether God and the unconscious are two different entities.

Both are border-line concepts for transcendental contents.

But empirically it can be established, with a sufficient degree of probability, that there is in the unconscious an archetype of
wholeness which manifests itself spontaneously in dreams, etc., and a tendency, independent of the conscious will, to relate other
archetypes to this centre.

Consequently, it does not seem improbable that the archetype of wholeness occupies as such a central position which approximates it to the God-image. ~Carl Jung, CW 11, Para 757

I am not, however, addressing myself to the happy possessors of faith, but to those many people for whom the light has gone out, the mystery has faded, and God is dead.

For most of them there is no going back, and one does not know either whether going back is always the better way.

To gain an understanding of religious matters, probably all that is left us today is the psychological approach.

That is why I take these thought-forms that have become historically fixed, try to melt them down again, and pour them into moulds of immediate experience.

It is certainly a difficult undertaking to discover connecting links between dogma and immediate experience of psychological archetypes, but a study of natural symbols of the unconscious gives us the necessary raw material. ~Carl Jung, CW 11, Para 148.

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Some Carl Jung Quotations XXXVIII [Red Book; Liber Novus]

This tangible and apparent world is one reality, but fantasy is the other reality: So long as we leave the God outside us apparent and tangible, he is unbearable and hopeless. ~ Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 283.

I have learned that in addition to the spirit of this time there is still another spirit at work, namely that which rules the depths of everything contemporary. ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 229.

A thinker should fear Salome, since she wants his head, especially if he is a holy man. A thinker cannot be a holy person, otherwise he loses his head. It does not help to hide oneself in thought. There the solidification overtakes you. You must turn back to motherly forethought to obtain renewal. But forethought leads to Salome. ~Carl Jung and Elijah, Liber Novus, Page 248.

Because I was a thinker and caught sight of the hostile principle of pleasure from forethinking, it appeared to me as Salome. If I had been one who felt, and had groped my way toward forethinking, then it would have appeared to me as a serpent-encoiled daimon, if I had actually seen it. ~Carl Jung and Elijah, Liber Novus, Page 248.

In the garden it had to become apparent to me that I loved Salome. This recognition struck me, since I had not thought it. What a thinker does not think he believes does not exist, and what one who feels does not feel he believes does not exist. You begin to have a presentiment of the whole when you embrace your opposite principle, since the whole belongs to both principles, which grow from one root. ~Carl Jung and Elijah, Liber Novus, Page 248.

The will of the God, that is stronger than you, you slave, you vessel. You have fallen into the hands of the greater. He knows no pity. Your Christian shrouds have fallen, the veils that blinded your eyes. The God has become strong again. ~Unknown Woman to Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 339.

The yoke of men is lighter than the yoke of the God; therefore everyone seeks to yoke the other out of mercy. But he who does not fall into the hands of men falls into those of the God. May he be well and may woe betide him! There is no escape. ~Unknown Woman to Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 339.

Outrage? I laugh at your outrage. The God knows only power and creation. He commands and you act. Your anxieties are laughable. There is only one road, the military road of the Godhead. ~Unknown Woman to Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 339.

Great is the need of the dead. But the God needs no sacrificial prayer. He has neither goodwill nor ill will. He is kind and fearful, though not actually so, but only seems to you thus. But the dead hear your prayers since they are still of human nature and not free of goodwill and ill will. ~Unknown woman to Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 339.

Jung noted: “Astrologically the beginning of the next aeon, according to the starting point you select, falls between AD 2000 and 2200” (CW 9,2, §149, note 88). ~Liber Novus, Page 316, Footnote 274.

.
“If as seems probable, the aeon of the fishes is ruled by the archetypal motif of the ‘hostile brothers,’ then the approach of the next Platonic month, namely Aquarius, will constellate the problem of the union of opposites. It will then no longer be possible to write off evil as a mere privatio boni; its real existence will have to be recognized”). ~Liber Novus, Page 316, Footnote 275

He [Jung] notes that around 7 BC there was a conjunction of Saturn and Jupiter, representing a union of extreme opposites, which would place the birth of Christ under Pisces. Pisces (Latin for “fishes”) is known as the sign of the fish and is often represented by two fish swimming in opposite directions. ~Liber Novus, Page 316, Footnote 273.

I bow, my soul, before unknown forces- I’d like to consecrate an altar to each unknown God. I must submit. The black iron in my heart gives me secret power. It’s like defiance and like contempt for men. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 308.

What does power avail us? We do not want to rule. We want to live, we want light and warmth, and hence we need yours. Just as the greening earth and every living body needs the sun, so we as spirits need your light and your warmth. A sunless spirit becomes the parasite of the body. But the God feeds the spirit. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 286.

An old secret fire burns between us, giving sparse light and ample warmth. The primordial fire that conquers every necessity shall burn again, since the night of the world is wide and cold, and the need is great. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 280.

My soul leads me into the desert, into the desert of my own self. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 235.

The serpent represents magical power, which also appears where animal drives are aroused imperceptibly in us. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 366.

My God rose in the Eastern sky; brighter than the heavenly host, and brought about a new day for all the peoples. This is why I want to go to Hell. Would a mother not want to give up her life for her child? How much easier would it be to give up my life if only my God could overcome the torment of the last hour of the night and victoriously break through the red mist of the morning? ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 289.

I do not doubt: I also want evil for the sake of my God. I enter the unequal battle, since it is always unequal and without doubt a lost cause. How terrible and despairing would this battle be otherwise? But precisely this is how it should and will be. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 289.

The devil knows what is beautiful, and hence he is the shadow of beauty and follows it everywhere, awaiting the moment when the beautiful, writhing great with child, seeks to give life to the God. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 289.

There is nothing the emptiness can sacrifice, since it always suffers lack Only fullness can sacrifice, since it has fullness. Emptiness cannot sacrifice its hunger for fullness, since it cannot deny its own essence. Therefore we also need evil. But I can sacrifice my will to evil, because I previously received fullness. All strength flows back to me again, since the evil one has destroyed the image I had of the formation of the God. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 289.

But the image of the God’s formation in me was not yet destroyed. I dread this destruction, since it is terrible, an unprecedented desecration of temples. Everything in me strives against this abysmal abomination. For I still did not know what it means to give birth to a God. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 289.

The sacrifice has been accomplished: the divine child, the image of the God’s formation, is slain, and I have eaten from the sacrificial flesh. The child, that is, the image of the God’s formation, not only bore my human craving, but also enclosed all the primordial and elemental powers that the sons of the sun possess as an inalienable inheritance. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 291.

We must regenerate ourselves. But as the creation of a God is a creative act of highest love, the restoration of our human life signifies an act of the Below. This is a great and dark mystery. Man cannot accomplish this act solely by himself but is assisted by evil, which does it instead of man. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 291.

But man must recognize his complicity in the act of evil. He must bear witness to this recognition by eating from the bloody sacrificial flesh. Through this act he testifies that he is a man, that he recognizes good as well as evil, and that he destroys the image of the God’s formation through withdrawing his life force, with which he also dissociates himself from the God. This occurs for the salvation of the soul, which is the true mother of the divine child. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 291.

When it bore and gave birth to the God, my soul was of human nature throughout; it possessed the primordial powers since time immemorial, but only in a dormant condition. They flowed into forming the God without my help. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 291.

Carl Jung: Carl Jung on “Complexes.

Everyone knows nowadays that people “have complexes.”

What is not so well known, though far more important theoretically, is that complexes can have us.

The existence of complexes throws serious doubt on the naïve assumption of the unity of consciousness, which is equated
with “psyche,” and on the supremacy of the will.

Every constellation of a complex postulates a disturbed state of consciousness.

The unity of consciousness is disrupted and the intentions of the will are impeded or made impossible.

Even memory is often noticeably affected, as we have seen.

The complex must therefore be a psychic factor which, in terms of energy, possesses a value that sometimes exceeds that of our
conscious intentions, otherwise such disruptions of the conscious order would not be possible at all. ~

Complexes are in truth the living units of the unconscious psyche, and it is only through them that we are able to deduce its
existence and its constitution.

The unconscious would in fact be—as it is in Wundt’s psychology—nothing but a vestige of dim or “obscure” representations, or a “fringe of consciousness,” as William James calls it, were it not for the existence of complexes.

That is why Freud became the real discoverer of the unconscious in psychology, because he examined those dark places and did not simply dismiss them, with a disparaging euphemism, as “parapraxes.”

The via regia to the unconscious, however, is not the dream, as he thought, but the complex, which is the architect of dreams and of symptoms.

Nor is this via so very “royal,” either, since the way pointed out by the complex is more like a rough and uncommonly devious footpath
that often loses itself in the undergrowth and generally leads not into the heart of the unconscious but past it. ~Carl Jung, CW 8, Para 210

What then, scientifically speaking, is a “feeling-toned complex?”

It is the image of a certain psychic situation which is strongly accentuated emotionally and is, moreover, incompatible with the habitual attitude ofconsciousness.

This image has a powerful inner coherence, it has its own wholeness and, in addition, a relatively high degree of autonomy, so that it is subject
to the control of the conscious mind to only a limited extent, and therefore behaves like annimated foreign body in the sphere of consciousness.

The complex can usually be suppressed with an effort of will, but not argued out of existence, and at the first suitable opportunity it reappears in all its original strength. ~Carl Jung, CW 8, Para 201

A complex can be really overcome only if it is lived out to the full. ~Carl Jung, CW 9i, Para 184

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Carl Jung Quotations XXXVII

It is not I who create myself, rather I happen to myself. ~Carl Jung, CW11, Para 391

Empirically considered, however, the archetype did not ever come into existence as a phenomenon of organic life,
but entered into the picture with life itself. ~Carl Jung, CW 11, Para 222.

Only that which acts upon me do I recognize as real and actual. But that which has no effect upon me might as well not exist. ~Carl Jung, CW 11, Para 757.

What most people overlook or seem unable to understand is the fact that I regard the psyche as real. Carl Jung, CW 11, Para 751

It does not seem to have occurred to people that when we say “psyche” we are alluding to the densest darkness it is possible to imagine. ~Carl Jung, CW 11, Para 448

Mere continuation can be left to the animals, but inauguration is the prerogative of man, the one thing he can boast of that lifts him above the beasts. ~Carl Jung, CW 10, Para 268

Unlived life is a destructive, irresistible force that works softly but inexorably. ~Carl Jung, CW 10, Para 252

Here each of us must ask: Have I any religious experience and immediate relation to God, and hence that certainty which will
keep me, as an individual, from dissolving in the crowd? Carl Jung, CW 10, Para 564

Religion, as the careful observation and taking account of certain invisible and uncontrollable factors, is an instinctive attitude peculiar to man, and its manifestations can be followed all through human history. ~Carl Jung, CW 10, Para 512

A creed coincides with the established Church or, at any rate, forms a public institution whose members include not only
true believers but vast numbers of people who can only be described as “indifferent” in matters of religion and who belong to
it simply by force of habit. Here the difference between a creed and a religion becomes palpable. ~Carl Jung, CW 10, Para 508.

For when the soul vanished at death, it was not lost; in that other world it formed the living counterpole to the state of death in this world. ~Carl Jung, CW 16, Para 493

Whatever man’s wholeness, or the self, may mean per se, empirically it is an image of the goal of life
spontaneously produced by the unconscious, irrespective of the wishes and fears of the conscious
mind. ~Carl Jung, CW 11, Para 745.

If we go further and consider the fact that man is also what neither he himself nor other people know
of him—an unknown something which can yet be proved to exist —the problem of identity
becomes more difficult still. ~Carl Jung, CW 11, Para 140

Indeed, it is quite impossible to define the extent and the ultimate character of psychic existence. ~Carl Jung, CW 11, Para 140

Freud has made a courageous attempt to elucidate the intricacies of dream psychology with the help of views
which he gathered in the field of psychopathology. ~Carl Jung, CW 11, Para 41

My method, like Freud’s, is built up on the practice of confession. Like him, I pay close attention to
dreams, but when it comes to the unconscious our views part company. ~Carl Jung, CW 11, Para 875

For me the unconscious is a collective psychic disposition, creative in character. ~Carl Jung, CW 11, Para 875

Freud’s procedure is, in the main, analytical and reductive. To this I add a synthesis which emphasizes the
purposiveness of unconscious tendencies with respect to personality development. ~Carl Jung, CW 11, Para 875

Behind a man’s actions there stands neither public opinion nor the moral code, but the personality of which he is still
unconscious. ~Carl Jung, CW 11, Para 390

When Nietzsche said “God is dead,” he uttered a truth which is valid for the greater part of Europe. People were
influenced by it not because he said so, but because it stated a widespread psychological fact. ~Carl Jung, CW 11, Para 145.

Yet it [Nietzche’s “God is Dead”] has, for some ears, the same eerie sound as that ancient cry which came echoing over the sea
to mark the end of the nature gods: “Great Pan is dead.” ~Carl Jung, CW 11, Para 145.

All opposites are of God, therefore man must bend to this burden; and in so doing he finds that God in his “oppositeness”
has taken possession of him, incarnated himself in him. ~Carl Jung, CW 11, Para 664.

It is quite right, therefore, that fear of God should be considered the beginning of all wisdom. ~Carl Jung, CW 11, Para 664.

Both are justified, the fear of God as well as the love of God. ~Carl Jung, CW 11, Para 664.

The East bases itself upon psychic reality, that is, upon the psyche as the main and unique condition
of existence. ~Carl Jung, CW 11, Para 770.

Some Carl Jung Quotations XXXVI

It is the privilege and the task of maturer people, who have passed the meridian of life, to create culture. ~Carl Jung, CW 10, Para 272

Consciousness is a precondition of being. ~Carl Jung, CW 10, Para 528

Knowledge of God is a transcendental problem. ~Carl Jung, CW 10, Para 565

And yet the attainment of consciousness was the most precious fruit of the tree of knowledge, the magical weapon
which gave man victory over the earth, and which we hope will give him a still greater victory over himself. ~Carl Jung, CW 10, Para 289

The unconscious is the only available source of religious experience. ~Carl Jung, CW 10, Para 289

The attainment of consciousness was the most precious fruit of the tree of knowledge, the magical weapon which gave man victory over the earth, and which we hope will give him a still greater victory over himself. ~Carl Jung, CW 10, Para 289

The fact that individual consciousness means separation and opposition is something that man has experienced
countless times in his long history. ~Carl Jung, CW 10, Para 290

The feeling of immortality, it seems to me, has its origin in a peculiar feeling of extension in space and time, and
I am inclined to regard the deification rites in the mysteries as a projection of this same psychic
phenomenon. ~Carl Jung, CW 9i, Para 248-249

The souls or spirits of the dead are identical with the psychic activity of the living; they merely continue it. ~Carl Jung, CW 9i, Para 38

This integration of the instincts is a prerequisite for individuation. ~Carl Jung, CW 9i, Para 660

Eternal truths are never true at any given moment in history. ~Carl Jung, CW 10, Para 1004

In our most private and most subjective lives we are not only the passive witnesses of our age, and its sufferers, but also
its makers. ~Carl Jung, CW 10, Para 315.

If the individual is not truly regenerated in spirit, society cannot be either, for society is the sum total of individuals in need of
redemption. ~Carl Jung, CW 10, Para 536

In our strength we are independent and isolated, are masters of our own fate; in our weakness we are dependent
and bound, and become unwilling instruments of fate, for here it is not the individual will that counts
but the will of the species. ~Carl Jung, CW 10, Para 261

But, precisely because the truest and most devoted love is also the most beautiful, let no man seek to
make it easy. ~Carl Jung, CW 10, Para 232

He is a sorry knight who shrinks from the difficulty of loving his lady. ~Carl Jung, CW 10, Para 232

Love is like God: both give themselves only to their bravest knights. ~Carl Jung, CW 10, Para 232

Every true and deep love is a sacrifice. The lover sacrifices all other possibilities, or rather, the illusion
that such possibilities exist. ~Carl Jung, CW 10, Para 231

When, towards middle life, the last gleam of childhood illusion fades—this it must be owned is true only of an
almost ideal life, for many go as children to their graves—then the archetype of the mature man or woman emerges from the
parental imago: an image of man as woman has known him from the beginning of time, and an image of woman that man carries
within him eternally. ~Carl Jung, CW 10, Para 74

A psychology of neurosis that sees only the negative elements empties out the baby with the bath-water, since it
neglects the positive meaning and value of these “infantile”—i.e., creative—fantasies. ~Carl Jung, CW 10, Para 355

Just as there is a relationship of mind to body, so there is a relationship of body to earth. ~Carl Jung, CW 10, Para 19

A civilization does not decay, it regenerates. ~Carl Jung, CW 10, Para 299

Was it not Meister Eckhart who said: “For this reason God is willing to bear the brunt of sins and often winks
at them, mostly sending them to people for whom he has prepared some high destiny. ~Carl Jung, CW 10, Para 440

Without guilt, unfortunately, there can be no psychic maturation and no widening of the spiritual horizon. ~Carl Jung, CW 10, Para 440

I know people who feel that the strange power in their own psyche is something divine, for the very simple reason that it has
given them an understanding of what is meant by religious experience. ~Carl Jung, CW 10, Para 312.

They [Religions] express the whole range of the psychic problem in mighty images; they are the avowal and
recognition of the soul, and at the same time the revelation of the soul’s nature. ~Carl Jung, CW 10, Para 367

Carl Jung: The technique of coming to terms with the animus is the same in principle as in the case of the anima

Instead of the woman merely associating opinions with external situations —the animus, as an associative function, should be directed
inwards, where it could associate the contents of the unconscious.

The technique of coming to terms with the animus is the same in principle as in the case of the anima; only here the woman must
learn to criticize and hold her opinions at a distance; not in order to repress them, but, by investigating their origins, to
penetrate more deeply into the background, where she will then discover the primordial images, just as the man does in his
dealings with the anima.

The animus is the deposit, as it were, of all woman’s ancestral experiences of man—and not only that, he is also a creative
and procreative being, not in the sense of masculine creativity, but in the sense that he brings forth something we might call the
spermatic word.

A woman possessed by the animus is always in danger of losing her femininity, her adapted feminine persona, just as a man
in like circumstances runs the risk of effeminacy.

Just as a man brings forth his work as a complete creation out of his inner feminine nature, so the inner masculine side of a woman brings
forth creative seeds which have the power to fertilize the feminine side of the man. ~Carl Jung, CW 7, Para 336.

These psychic changes of sex are due entirely to the fact that a function which belongs inside has been turned outside.

The reason for this perversion is clearly the failure to give adequate recognition to an inner world which stands autonomously opposed to the
outer world, and makes just as serious demands on our capacity for adaptation. ~Carl Jung, CW 7, Para 337

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